Books on my Nightstand in 2012

Tuesday, January 15, 2013


Reading is one of those simple pleasures that just seems to fall by the wayside as I get older and responsibilities mount.  Not that being busy is a terribly great excuse to stop reading, but it's really the only one I've got.  I did, however, manage to squeeze quite a few more books than usual into my spare moments last year, and I wanted to mention the three that left the longest impression with me.  (P.S. Can you spot the puppy?) ;)

The Thirteenth Tale was definitely my beach read, although after having finished it I came to realize it was probably much too heavy for that category.  It is quite possibly one of the most well-spun stories I've ever had the pleasure to sink my teeth into, and I actually got kind of depressed at the end when I learned that Diane Setterfield hadn't written any novels before or since.  This book is the epitome of a page-turner, and kept me hooked from the jump with intriguing promises of insane characters with twisted histories, and a broken main character who kept the story moving by telling one of the most interesting stories I've ever read.  To put it plainly, this book is one of those that make you sad when it's over because you can never read it again for the first time.

Later on in the year, I decided to relive my childhood by going back to a series that I had first picked up at the probably too-young age of 11.  Brighton-born Louise Rennison is, I'm quite sure, the funniest author I've ever read.  It takes a lot for a book to make me actually LOL, but I had to be sure and not read this one in public for fear that the laughing fits it caused might make people uneasy.  Love is a Many Trousered Thing is the 8th book in a ten part series penned in diary style by the lovably goofy protagonist, Georgia.  Probably the funniest thing about the books that I learned only recently, is that almost all of the happenings were real events that took place in Rennison's actual life.  The best bit: she didn't even bother to change any names (except of course Louise became Georgia)!

My final favorite from last year is also part of a series, referred to as the Dublin Murder Squad books.  The Likeness is the second book of four (soon to be five) written by Irish author Tana French, and is a real page-turner (are you seeing a pattern here?).  In typical crime-novel style, there's a murder, and an investigation that ensues.  This novel centers around a detective from book one (which is not necessary to read in order to understand what goes down in the following books) who goes deep undercover to solve the murder of a woman who seems to have just appeared in Ireland one day with no trace of a personal history.  Very mysterious indeed.  All in all, this was a very interesting read and definitely kept me hooked throughout, but French has a tendency to pay far too much attention to the story, and then leaving you unsatisfied with the way things wrap up.  I've been slowly reading the rest of her series, but quite honestly there are more satisfying reads out there.  It should be said, however, that French is an amazing storyteller, and I find her strong point to be her dialogue.

Well there you have it, the most interesting reads that passed through my hands and found a home on my nightstand in 2012.  One of my resolutions was to read more books this year, so if anybody has any recommendationsmystery or otherwise—please don't be shy in letting me know, as I'm just dying to get my paws on another page-turner!

You can see what else I'm reading on my Goodreads profile here!


5 comments:

  1. Reading more is a resolution of mine as well. I'm currently reading Water for Elephants (late, I know). Its pretty good so far. I think I'm gonna look into the Thirteenth Tale. Thanks! :-)

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    1. That's on my To-Read list! Hope it stands up to the hype! x

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    2. Water for Elephants was really good!

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  2. Do you think you'd like murder mysteries set in the background of Missouri in the early 1900s, and Harlem and Midtown Manhattan in the early 1900s? An acquaintance of mine in Seattle, Larry Karp, researches the history and times of the ragtime composer, Scott Joplin, then writes murder mysteries using the history of these times. The Ragtime Kid and the King of Ragtime are 2 of his mysteries. The King of Ragtime takes place in Harlem and midtown Manhattan in the early 1900s. The murder takes place against the historic feud between Scott Joplin, the African American ragtime composer, and Irving Berlin as to who is the true composer of the famous song Alexander's Ragtime Band. Have you read any of Janet Evanovich's mystery series about the New Jersey bounty hunter, Stephanie Plum, whose mother wishes that Stephanie would get a normal job like a sales girl at Macy's - instead of working as a bounty hunter? They are very funny.

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    1. Ooooh all good recs! I foresee my library card getting a ton of use... x

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